IPLCs

Indigenous People and Local Communities (IPLC)

The identities, cultures, spirituality, and lifeways of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) are inextricably linked to biodiversity. GAA, IPLC community-based conservation have been effective in preventing habitat loss, often more effective than traditional conservation methods through expanding recognition of IPLC land rights is an effective, moral, and affordable solution for protecting Africa and preventing the Indigenous rights violations that have historically plagued many traditional conservation strategies.

GAA marine coastal community awareness and sensitization.

Given the new reality of the global coronavirus pandemic and mounting evidence, GAA suggesting that deforestation and biodiversity loss enable the emergence of potentially dangerous pathogens, threats to the role of IPLCs as protectors of biodiversity has gained even greater urgency. Indigenous and local knowledge systems are connected to and dependent on the local context, but their impact is regional and thus national relevant.

CONSERVING NATURE MUST FULLY INTEGRATE AND RESPECT INDIGENOUS LEADERSHIP AND INDIGENOUS RIGHTS.

Efforts to combat climate change and biodiversity loss are incomplete without a focus on correcting environmental injustice. We must acknowledge the links between the abuse of nature and people if we are going to protect the planet.

We’re not truly protecting nature or the planet if conservation efforts result in the rights violations, abuse or marginalization of the people currently protecting some of the most intact ecosystems on the planet. 

Historically, protected areas have not always respected the rights of Indigenous Peoples and in some cases have led to violence, displacement, and human rights violations. This “fortress model” has also fallen short of its goals because local communities have not been fully involved in decision-making and benefit sharing. 

It is in recognition of these grave wrongdoings and the clear scientific evidence that the GAA believes that the Convention on Biological Diversity’s post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework must advance a new paradigm for conservation with a new conception of protected and conserved areas in which the rights of Indigenous Peoples are fully respected and secured. It is also critical that accountability is built into a final agreement.